artandsciencejournal:

Outer-site Art
 
Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.
 
Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.
 
But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

- Alinta Krauth 
artandsciencejournal:

Outer-site Art
 
Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.
 
Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.
 
But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

- Alinta Krauth 
artandsciencejournal:

Outer-site Art
 
Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.
 
Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.
 
But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

- Alinta Krauth 
artandsciencejournal:

Outer-site Art
 
Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.
 
Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.
 
But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

- Alinta Krauth 

artandsciencejournal:

Outer-site Art

 

Tokyo-based artist Makoto Azuma doesn’t appear to believe in doing things by halves. His latest installation looks at the universe, beyond Earth, as a site for appreciating beauty and art. Two pieces, a Japanese white pine bonsai known as the “Shiki 1”, and an untitled arrangement of orchids, hydrangeas, lilies and irises, were launched into the stratosphere last week in the Black Rock Desert, Nevada. This is part of project Exobotanica – Botanical Space Flight (see more pictures here), where Azuma heads a 10 person team, coupled with Sacramento-based JP Aerospace — “America’s Other Space Program”, a volunteer-based organization that constructs and sends vessels into orbit.

 

Azuma is interested in the beauty of organic movement in plants, and how this beauty would be suspended in space as a weightless environment. The objects themselves – the bonsai plant and the flower arrangement, have an almost uneasy juxtaposition in their nature. On the one hand, they are organic, Earth-bound items that send instant connotations to the viewer about the beauty of our natural world, yet both represent a natural world moulded by human hands – the miniaturised tree and the specifically arranged flowers. In the end, they can almost be seen less as art and more as specific examples of Earthly design; an amalgamation of human and mother nature’s architecture, broadcast to the universe beyond.

 

But equally as stunning is the documentary imagery itself, taken from orbit and brought back to Earth. Oh to see what those blossoms have seen!

- Alinta Krauth 

explore-blog:

Kierkegaard on our greatest source of unhappiness. (And as a wise woman reminded us centuries later, “busy is a decision.”)

thelandofmaps:

Detailed map of languages within the Middle East [7282x5818]
CLICK HERE FOR MORE MAPS!
thelandofmaps.tumblr.com

poetsorg:

Beautiful video poem by Kai Carlson-Wee.

Yes

Phytoplankton Bloom off the Pacific Northwest

In the early afternoon on July 26, 2014, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’sAqua satellite acquired this natural-color view of a massive bloom of phytoplankton off the coast of Oregon and Washington. The floating, plant-like organisms give the water a milky green color in satellite imagery.

Marine phytoplankton require just the right amount of sunlight, dissolved nutrients, and moderate water temperatures—not too hot, not too cold—to make their populations explode into blooms that cover hundreds of square kilometers of the sea. In the Pacific Northwest of North America in the summer, warming land temperatures create favorable winds that blow offshore and push surface waters away from the coast. This causes cooler, nutrient-rich waters to well up from the depths and provide the right conditions for blooms. The phytoplankton can become a rich food source for zooplankton, fish, and other marine species; however, some species can also deplete the water of oxygen and become toxic to marine life.

“Blooms of this type are common during the summer due to the coastal upwelling process,” said Bill Peterson of NOAA’s Northwest Fisheries Science Center, whose team samples the waters off Oregon every two weeks. “What is uncommon is the ability to see so much of the coast in a single image because fog and low-elevation clouds often obscure large-scale views.”

According to Peterson, water samples taken from ships on July 22, 2014, were dominated by diatoms—Dactyliosolen fragilissima, Lepotocylindricus sp, and three species of Thalassiosira—species that “occur commonly in the upwelling zone of the northern California Current.” Researchers counted one million to three million cells per liter of water.

Angelicque White, a marine biologist at Oregon State University, noted that satellites measure sea surface temperatures and fluorescence, a proxy for the amount of sunlight-harvesting chlorophyll in phytoplankton. These data allow researchers to detect upwelling events and blooms and study them over time. White’s group maintains a web site showing these data for the northwest coast.

Note how the abundance of phytoplankton appears to be reduced in the area just offshore from the Columbia River. It is possible that the outflow affected the amount of upwelling and mixing, or it changed the salinity, temperature, or other water properties nearby. As the river enters the ocean, it generates a freshwater plume that mixes with the surrounding seawater, diluting it and the phytoplankton contained within.

  1. Related Reading

  2. Department of Ecology, State of Washington Marine Algae Blooms. Accessed July 30, 2014.
  3. NASA Earth Observatory (2010, July 13) What Are Phytoplankton?
  4. NASA Earth Observatory (2014, July) Global Maps: Chlorophyll

NASA image courtesy Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE/EOSDIS MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. Caption by Mike Carlowicz.

Instrument(s): Aqua - MODIS

(Source: earth-as-art)

electricspacekoolaid:

Trying out new editing

fromquarkstoquasars:

The Rosetta spacecraft has finally arrived at its destination! Next stop, we’re actually going to send a lander to the surface. Learn more here: http://bit.ly/1mnMK0S

archaeologicalnews:

image

One of Britain’s most important archaeological sites – a vast Iron Age hill fort at Hambledon Hill, Dorset – has been acquired by the National Trust.

It is the organisation’s most significant archaeological acquisition for more than 30 years. With £450,000 from bequests and from Natural…

Good news

Whoa!

micdotcom:

5 groups that fund the anti-marijuana cause for their own gain 

A new OpenSecrets report has revealed some of the biggest donors to anti-marijuana legalization campaigns and politicians — and there’s serious money involved. When marijuana reform laws are on the ballot in your state, you should know that people with a financial interest in keeping marijuana illegal are bankrolling those scare ads and anti-pot PSAs.
Here are the five biggest groups OpenSecrets thinks have ulterior motives in mind for backing the War on Drugs.
Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

5 groups that fund the anti-marijuana cause for their own gain 

A new OpenSecrets report has revealed some of the biggest donors to anti-marijuana legalization campaigns and politicians — and there’s serious money involved. When marijuana reform laws are on the ballot in your state, you should know that people with a financial interest in keeping marijuana illegal are bankrolling those scare ads and anti-pot PSAs.
Here are the five biggest groups OpenSecrets thinks have ulterior motives in mind for backing the War on Drugs.
Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

5 groups that fund the anti-marijuana cause for their own gain 

A new OpenSecrets report has revealed some of the biggest donors to anti-marijuana legalization campaigns and politicians — and there’s serious money involved. When marijuana reform laws are on the ballot in your state, you should know that people with a financial interest in keeping marijuana illegal are bankrolling those scare ads and anti-pot PSAs.
Here are the five biggest groups OpenSecrets thinks have ulterior motives in mind for backing the War on Drugs.
Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

5 groups that fund the anti-marijuana cause for their own gain 

A new OpenSecrets report has revealed some of the biggest donors to anti-marijuana legalization campaigns and politicians — and there’s serious money involved. When marijuana reform laws are on the ballot in your state, you should know that people with a financial interest in keeping marijuana illegal are bankrolling those scare ads and anti-pot PSAs.
Here are the five biggest groups OpenSecrets thinks have ulterior motives in mind for backing the War on Drugs.
Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

5 groups that fund the anti-marijuana cause for their own gain 

A new OpenSecrets report has revealed some of the biggest donors to anti-marijuana legalization campaigns and politicians — and there’s serious money involved. When marijuana reform laws are on the ballot in your state, you should know that people with a financial interest in keeping marijuana illegal are bankrolling those scare ads and anti-pot PSAs.
Here are the five biggest groups OpenSecrets thinks have ulterior motives in mind for backing the War on Drugs.
Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

5 groups that fund the anti-marijuana cause for their own gain 

A new OpenSecrets report has revealed some of the biggest donors to anti-marijuana legalization campaigns and politicians — and there’s serious money involved. When marijuana reform laws are on the ballot in your state, you should know that people with a financial interest in keeping marijuana illegal are bankrolling those scare ads and anti-pot PSAs.
Here are the five biggest groups OpenSecrets thinks have ulterior motives in mind for backing the War on Drugs.
Follow micdotcom

micdotcom:

5 groups that fund the anti-marijuana cause for their own gain 

A new OpenSecrets report has revealed some of the biggest donors to anti-marijuana legalization campaigns and politicians — and there’s serious money involved. When marijuana reform laws are on the ballot in your state, you should know that people with a financial interest in keeping marijuana illegal are bankrolling those scare ads and anti-pot PSAs.

Here are the five biggest groups OpenSecrets thinks have ulterior motives in mind for backing the War on Drugs.

Follow micdotcom

sixpenceee:

Did you know that sperm whales sleep vertically? 

SOURCE