biovisual:

Baby Squid Photography by Jeannot Kuenzel - MaltaAll rights reserved by Jeannot Kuenzelsharing enabled / downloading enabledPosted on Flickr March 29 and 31, 2014
top imageEGGS of Loligo vulgaris: the European squid, a large squid belonging to the family Loliginidae.
bottom image

Two stages of the development of a [European squid] are visible in the picture. These eggs are about 3mm in diameter; when the little squid inside has used up all the nutrients (all the yolk that is attached to it), it plops its suckers to the inside of the diaphragm and releases enzymes that will aid opening the shell, pushing through the opening - and a tiny new ALIEN of the DEEP is born :]
Notice the CHROMATOPHORES already embedded in its skin and the tiny little SIPHON… BTW, the SQUID on the left is actually laying on its back…

biovisual:

Baby Squid Photography by Jeannot Kuenzel - MaltaAll rights reserved by Jeannot Kuenzelsharing enabled / downloading enabledPosted on Flickr March 29 and 31, 2014
top imageEGGS of Loligo vulgaris: the European squid, a large squid belonging to the family Loliginidae.
bottom image

Two stages of the development of a [European squid] are visible in the picture. These eggs are about 3mm in diameter; when the little squid inside has used up all the nutrients (all the yolk that is attached to it), it plops its suckers to the inside of the diaphragm and releases enzymes that will aid opening the shell, pushing through the opening - and a tiny new ALIEN of the DEEP is born :]
Notice the CHROMATOPHORES already embedded in its skin and the tiny little SIPHON… BTW, the SQUID on the left is actually laying on its back…

biovisual:

Baby Squid Photography by Jeannot Kuenzel - Malta
All rights reserved by Jeannot Kuenzel
sharing enabled / downloading enabled
Posted on Flickr March 29 and 31, 2014

top image
EGGS of Loligo vulgaris: the European squid, a large squid belonging to the family Loliginidae.

bottom image

Two stages of the development of a [European squid] are visible in the picture. These eggs are about 3mm in diameter; when the little squid inside has used up all the nutrients (all the yolk that is attached to it), it plops its suckers to the inside of the diaphragm and releases enzymes that will aid opening the shell, pushing through the opening - and a tiny new ALIEN of the DEEP is born :]

Notice the CHROMATOPHORES already embedded in its skin and the tiny little SIPHON… BTW, the SQUID on the left is actually laying on its back…

buggirl:

This little guy had the most amazing spikes and colors.  Santa Lucia, Ecuador.
Sorry about the raindrops on my lens but it was the cloud forest so it rained constantly.
buggirl:

This little guy had the most amazing spikes and colors.  Santa Lucia, Ecuador.
Sorry about the raindrops on my lens but it was the cloud forest so it rained constantly.

buggirl:

This little guy had the most amazing spikes and colors.  Santa Lucia, Ecuador.

Sorry about the raindrops on my lens but it was the cloud forest so it rained constantly.

we-are-star-stuff:

Why are all planets spheres?
The myth that the Earth was flat persisted far longer than it should have. Philosophers and scientists suggested the Earth was round as far back as Pythagoras, or perhaps even further, and Eratosthenes even calculated its circumference with decent accuracy in the second century BC. It went on for centuries more, ultimately culminating in that most basic satisfying piece of evidence: the photos of the Earth as seen from space. Not even the most scientifically illiterate person could now doubt the facts. Earth is a sphere.
But why is the Earth, like all other planets, a sphere? Not to be evasive, but the simplest answer is: because they’re planets. When trying to come up with a mass threshold to differentiate planets from smaller bodies like asteroids, one of the primary rubrics is whether the body is massive enough to hold a spherical shape. So, there’s a giveaway: the answer is related to mass - and the most obvious force related to mass is, of course, gravity.
The reason planets are spherical is because the mass of the whole body creates a gravity well that is theoretically centered on the mass-center of the body itself. An irregularly shaped protoplanet, say with a lobe of heavy material sticking out in one direction, might have its gravitational center pulled away from the physical center of the shape. Over millions and billions of years, though, the strong pull down in all directions evens out those bumps.
The constituents of Earth might seem solid, but they are malleable under so much strain, and can flow like putty. In essence, gravity slowly deforms a planet to turn the gravitational center into the physical center. On a long enough timeline, the slow, even pull down the gravity well compresses a planet down to the most compact distribution around the center - in other words, a sphere.
Asteroids are often very oddly shaped with multiple lobes or jutting arms. This is because they are too small to create enough gravity to compress themselves down into a ball. Compared with the internal forces that hold matter together, gravity is very weak. A body must grow very large to exert enough gravity to overcome those forces. Many comets are much closer to spherical, however, because it takes so much less force to change the shape of ice than of rock.
[Continue Reading]

we-are-star-stuff:

Why are all planets spheres?

The myth that the Earth was flat persisted far longer than it should have. Philosophers and scientists suggested the Earth was round as far back as Pythagoras, or perhaps even further, and Eratosthenes even calculated its circumference with decent accuracy in the second century BC. It went on for centuries more, ultimately culminating in that most basic satisfying piece of evidence: the photos of the Earth as seen from space. Not even the most scientifically illiterate person could now doubt the facts. Earth is a sphere.

But why is the Earth, like all other planets, a sphere? Not to be evasive, but the simplest answer is: because they’re planets. When trying to come up with a mass threshold to differentiate planets from smaller bodies like asteroids, one of the primary rubrics is whether the body is massive enough to hold a spherical shape. So, there’s a giveaway: the answer is related to mass - and the most obvious force related to mass is, of course, gravity.

The reason planets are spherical is because the mass of the whole body creates a gravity well that is theoretically centered on the mass-center of the body itself. An irregularly shaped protoplanet, say with a lobe of heavy material sticking out in one direction, might have its gravitational center pulled away from the physical center of the shape. Over millions and billions of years, though, the strong pull down in all directions evens out those bumps.

The constituents of Earth might seem solid, but they are malleable under so much strain, and can flow like putty. In essence, gravity slowly deforms a planet to turn the gravitational center into the physical center. On a long enough timeline, the slow, even pull down the gravity well compresses a planet down to the most compact distribution around the center - in other words, a sphere.

Asteroids are often very oddly shaped with multiple lobes or jutting arms. This is because they are too small to create enough gravity to compress themselves down into a ball. Compared with the internal forces that hold matter together, gravity is very weak. A body must grow very large to exert enough gravity to overcome those forces. Many comets are much closer to spherical, however, because it takes so much less force to change the shape of ice than of rock.

[Continue Reading]

iamjapanese:

Beth Van Hoesen(American, 1926-2010)

Green Coconut    1980

drawing

  1. Aperture: f/0.99933437960345
  2. Exposure: 1/1th
givemeinternet:

Shhh it’s starting

givemeinternet:

Shhh it’s starting

bobbydoherty:

Catalina Macaw for New York Magazine

  1. Camera: Canon EOS-1Ds Mark III
  2. Aperture: f/18
  3. Exposure: 1/160th
  4. Focal Length: 100mm

gurafiku:

Japanese Magazine Cover: Mizue. Koshiro Onchi. 1931


James Turrell, Skyspace I, 1974

James TurrellSkyspace I1974

(Source: excdus)

artemisdreaming:

Statuette of a Woman: “The Stargazer”, c. 3000 BC
Early Bronze Age, Western Anatolia?, 3rd Millennium BC
marble, Overall - h:17.20 w:6.50 d:6.30 cm (h:6 3/4 w:2 1/2 d:2 7/16 inches) Wt: 1 lb.. Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. Fund; John L. Severance Fund 1993.165
Cleveland Museum of Art, Gallery 102a
The Stargazer
Image and Description from Cleveland Museum of Art:  ”Executed in translucent marble this is one of the oldest sculptures of the human figure in the museum. The incised triangle at the pelvis indicates that this is a female figure. Her head is sculpted fully in the round while her body is reduced to an elegant profile. The figure’s meaning and context are unknown, though it probably carries religious connotations related to fertility and abundance. This Kilia-type figure, named for an excavation site in what is now Turkey, is one of about 30 such figures known, and is especially rare because it is complete. She is a “stargazer” because her eyes look to the stars above, home of powerful divine forces.”
artemisdreaming:

Statuette of a Woman: “The Stargazer”, c. 3000 BC
Early Bronze Age, Western Anatolia?, 3rd Millennium BC
marble, Overall - h:17.20 w:6.50 d:6.30 cm (h:6 3/4 w:2 1/2 d:2 7/16 inches) Wt: 1 lb.. Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. Fund; John L. Severance Fund 1993.165
Cleveland Museum of Art, Gallery 102a
The Stargazer
Image and Description from Cleveland Museum of Art:  ”Executed in translucent marble this is one of the oldest sculptures of the human figure in the museum. The incised triangle at the pelvis indicates that this is a female figure. Her head is sculpted fully in the round while her body is reduced to an elegant profile. The figure’s meaning and context are unknown, though it probably carries religious connotations related to fertility and abundance. This Kilia-type figure, named for an excavation site in what is now Turkey, is one of about 30 such figures known, and is especially rare because it is complete. She is a “stargazer” because her eyes look to the stars above, home of powerful divine forces.”

artemisdreaming:

Statuette of a Woman: “The Stargazer”, c. 3000 BC

Early Bronze Age, Western Anatolia?, 3rd Millennium BC

marble, Overall - h:17.20 w:6.50 d:6.30 cm (h:6 3/4 w:2 1/2 d:2 7/16 inches) Wt: 1 lb.. Leonard C. Hanna, Jr. Fund; John L. Severance Fund 1993.165

Cleveland Museum of Art, Gallery 102a

The Stargazer

Image and Description from Cleveland Museum of Art:  ”Executed in translucent marble this is one of the oldest sculptures of the human figure in the museum. The incised triangle at the pelvis indicates that this is a female figure. Her head is sculpted fully in the round while her body is reduced to an elegant profile. The figure’s meaning and context are unknown, though it probably carries religious connotations related to fertility and abundance. This Kilia-type figure, named for an excavation site in what is now Turkey, is one of about 30 such figures known, and is especially rare because it is complete. She is a “stargazer” because her eyes look to the stars above, home of powerful divine forces.”

crookedindifference:

What is the most astounding fact you can share with us about the Universe?

Neil deGrasse Tyson, PhD: The most astounding fact… is the knowledge that the atoms that comprise life on Earth, the atoms that make up the human body, are traceable to the crucibles that cooked light elements into heavy elements in their core under extreme temperatures and pressures. These stars, the high mass ones among them went unstable in their later years they collapsed and then exploded scattering their enriched guts across the galaxy. Guts made of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and all the fundamental ingredients of life itself. These ingredients become part of gas cloud that condense, collapse, form the next generation of solar systems… stars with orbiting planets, and those planets now have the ingredients for life itself.

So that when I look up at the night sky and I know that yes, we are part of this universe, we are in this universe, but perhaps more important than both of those facts is that the universe is in us.

When I reflect on that fact, I look up – many people feel small because they’re small and the universe is big – but I feel big, because my atoms came from those stars. There’s a level of connectivity. That’s really what you want in life, you want to feel connected, you want to feel relevant, you want to feel like a participant in the goings-on of activities and events around you. That’s precisely what we are, just by being alive…

artandsciencejournal:

A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones
artandsciencejournal:

A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones
artandsciencejournal:

A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones
artandsciencejournal:

A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones
artandsciencejournal:

A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones
artandsciencejournal:

A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones
artandsciencejournal:

A Form of Happiness: Dopamine
We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.
A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 
Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio. 
- Lee Jones

artandsciencejournal:

A Form of Happiness: Dopamine

We have all felt the rush and experienced the feeling of happiness, and Speculative Design artist Jessica Charlesworth, along with her husband, Product Designer Tim Parsons, has made it tangible. The couples’ A Form of Happiness project has masterfully resulted in their creation of a wood and magnetic representation of the neurotransmitter responsible for releasing the chemical that fuels our desire for happiness. The effects of the organic chemical, dopamine, are likened to the euphoric feeling and pleasurable physical reaction to things such as searching through sale racks while shopping, enjoying a delicious meal, or the pleasure received from engaging in sexual activity.

A Form of Happiness, displayed as the physical model of dopamine, is part of a kit that allows user to assemble the wooden pieces into the chemical compound strand. Each part is held together by embedded neodymium magnets. The kit includes examples of the various roles that the physical piece could take on and provides a more vivid display of what occurs during moments when dopamine is released. Charlesworth and Parsons pose the question, ‘What makes you happy?’ and while the answers will vary by person, as their model and kit prove, the feeling is the same for everyone. Happiness is a simple chemical reaction we seek it throughout life; a chemical bit of magic. 

Visit Jessica Charlesworth’s Portfolio

- Lee Jones

elvira:

kateoplis:

I do absolutely nothing [in my free time]. I go home and stay there. I wash and scrub up each day, and that’s it. One month I actually grew a mustache, just so I could say that I’d done something.”

<3